The Third Chimpanzee
Curating bits and pieces of Anthropology, Archaeology, Primatology, Psychology, Biology… basically anything that can help us attempt to understand the past, present and future of our species.
throughascientificlens:

The Human Connectome

This immense scientific project aims to create a comprehensive map of the all the neural connections in the brain, an undertaking which has been fronted by the Human Connectome Project which is sponsored by the National Institute of Health in the US.
The Human Connectome Project aims to decipher the interactions of neurons and synapses in healthy, living adult humans. Mapping of the brain can be spit into certain scales, ranging from single neurons, to populations of neurons, to cortical areas. It is thought that once sufficient data is gathered we will be able to stitch each level together to form one large, comprehensive map.
With current technology we are currently unable to capture the brain’s activity at the cellular level without using invasive procedures. Mapping the connectome at this level usually requires a post-mortem and thus is not ideal.
At the macro scale which is at the level of clusters of neurons and fibers; recent methods and advances have seen non-invasive mapping emerge rather successfully. At this level functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is used in conjunction with tractography- a procedure used to demonstrate neural tracts. (x)

throughascientificlens:

The Human Connectome

This immense scientific project aims to create a comprehensive map of the all the neural connections in the brain, an undertaking which has been fronted by the Human Connectome Project which is sponsored by the National Institute of Health in the US.

The Human Connectome Project aims to decipher the interactions of neurons and synapses in healthy, living adult humans. Mapping of the brain can be spit into certain scales, ranging from single neurons, to populations of neurons, to cortical areas. It is thought that once sufficient data is gathered we will be able to stitch each level together to form one large, comprehensive map.

With current technology we are currently unable to capture the brain’s activity at the cellular level without using invasive procedures. Mapping the connectome at this level usually requires a post-mortem and thus is not ideal.

At the macro scale which is at the level of clusters of neurons and fibers; recent methods and advances have seen non-invasive mapping emerge rather successfully. At this level functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is used in conjunction with tractography- a procedure used to demonstrate neural tracts. (x)

Posted on July 23 with 197 notes at 5:35 pm

Posted on July 23 with 107 notes at 5:25 pm

amansaidtotheuniverse:

An accurate diagram of Human Evolution

amansaidtotheuniverse:

An accurate diagram of Human Evolution

Posted on July 23 with 8 notes at 5:17 pm

theolduvaigorge:

Digital Reconstructions of Hominids from the set ‘Descendenteí,’ Human Kind Lineage Project

Identification:

Click through for full sequential soft tissue facial reconstruction posters from The Human Kind Lineage Project

(Source: Behance.net)

Posted on July 22 with 2,474 notes at 9:43 pm

exitingempires:

a. afarensis and i are bros tho

no homo

Posted on July 21 with 9 notes at 5:41 pm

Humans share biological markers with friends much as we do with extended family members, says a scientific study

Friends often look alike. The tendency of people to forge friendships with people of a similar appearance has been noted since the time of Plato. But now there is research suggesting that, to a striking degree, we tend to pick friends who are genetically similar to us in ways that go beyond superficial features.
For example, you and your friends are likely to share genes associated with the sense of smell.
Our friends are as similar to us genetically as you’d expect fourth cousins to be, according to the study published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This means that the number of genetic markers shared by two friends is akin to what would be expected if they had the same great-great-great-grandparents.
"Your friends don’t just resemble you superficially, they resemble you genetically," said Nicholas Christakis, a physician and social scientist at Yale University and a co-author of the study… (Full article from The Guardian)

Humans share biological markers with friends much as we do with extended family members, says a scientific study

Friends often look alike. The tendency of people to forge friendships with people of a similar appearance has been noted since the time of Plato. But now there is research suggesting that, to a striking degree, we tend to pick friends who are genetically similar to us in ways that go beyond superficial features.

For example, you and your friends are likely to share genes associated with the sense of smell.

Our friends are as similar to us genetically as you’d expect fourth cousins to be, according to the study published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This means that the number of genetic markers shared by two friends is akin to what would be expected if they had the same great-great-great-grandparents.

"Your friends don’t just resemble you superficially, they resemble you genetically," said Nicholas Christakis, a physician and social scientist at Yale University and a co-author of the study… (Full article from The Guardian)

Posted on July 21 with 7 notes at 5:39 pm

If one small and odd lineage of fishes had not evolved fins capable of bearing weight on land (though evolved for different reasons in lakes and seas,) terrestrial vertebrates would never have arisen. If a large extraterrestrial object—the ultimate random bolt from the blue—had not triggered the extinction of dinosaurs 65 million years ago, mammals would still be small creatures, confined to the nooks and crannies of a dinosaur’s world, and incapable of evolving the larger size that brains big enough for self-consciousness require. If a small and tenuous population of protohumans had not survived a hundred slings and arrows of outrageous fortune (and potential extinction) on the savannas of Africa, then Homo sapiens would never have emerged to spread throughout the globe. We are glorious accidents of an unpredictable process with no drive to complexity, not the expected results of evolutionary principles that yearn to produce a creature capable of understanding the mode of its own necessary construction.
-Stephen Jay Gould
Full House: The Spread of Excellence from Plato to Darwin (1996)
Posted on July 20 with 531 notes at 6:38 pm

Are Humans Uniquely Unique?

In the latest episode of the BBC’s Infinite Monkey Cage, Robin Ince and Brian Cox are joined by comedian Ross Noble and evolutionary psychologists Keith Jensen and Katie Slocombe to discuss whether humans are uniquely unique?
This show was first broadcast on Monday the 14th of July on BBC Radio 4 and is now available via the BBC Website and to download from iTunes.  

Are Humans Uniquely Unique?

In the latest episode of the BBC’s Infinite Monkey Cage, Robin Ince and Brian Cox are joined by comedian Ross Noble and evolutionary psychologists Keith Jensen and Katie Slocombe to discuss whether humans are uniquely unique?

This show was first broadcast on Monday the 14th of July on BBC Radio 4 and is now available via the BBC Website and to download from iTunes.  

Posted on July 15 with 10 notes at 8:17 pm

You and I, in fact everyone all over the world,
we’re literally African under the skin; brothers and sisters separated by a mere two thousand generations.
Old-fashioned concepts of race are not only socially divisive,
but scientifically wrong.
-Dr. Spencer Wells, Genographic Project lead scientist (via thedragoninmygarage)
Posted on July 9 with 1,725 notes at 9:33 pm

Why clap? Why not buzz like a bee? (Guardian article)

Applause gives smartarses a chance to show off at concerts – but there are signs this ‘social contagion’ may be on the way out
Clapping, scientists at Uppsala University in Sweden have reported, is a form of “social contagion”. What you’re clapping, apparently, is not as important as joining in with the people clapping all round you. “The cessation of applause is similarly socially mediated,” say the scientists, “but is to a lesser degree controlled by the reluctance of individuals to clap too many times.”

Why clap? Why not buzz like a bee? (Guardian article)

Applause gives smartarses a chance to show off at concerts – but there are signs this ‘social contagion’ may be on the way out

Clapping, scientists at Uppsala University in Sweden have reported, is a form of “social contagion”. What you’re clapping, apparently, is not as important as joining in with the people clapping all round you. “The cessation of applause is similarly socially mediated,” say the scientists, “but is to a lesser degree controlled by the reluctance of individuals to clap too many times.”

Posted on July 9 with 4 notes at 8:40 pm