The Third Chimpanzee
Curating bits and pieces of Anthropology, Archaeology, Primatology, Psychology, Biology… basically anything that can help us attempt to understand the past, present and future of our species.
FOLLOW ALL THE SCIENCE BLOGS! Masterpost: Part 1

shychemist:

[Updated 07/03/2014]

Hello everyone. This has been a little project of mine over the past few days 

I hope you all enjoy this listing, and share it around. Share all the science. :3

Disclaimer:

I will be editing this from time to time and I’ll keep a link to it on my blog so you can find it easily.

This is not meant to be a list of all science blogs on tumblr. Only all the ones I know about (which is still a lot but definitely not all). The blogs listed are all active as well (within the past few weeks).

If you are not on the list and want me to check out your blog, send me a message. I may or may not follow you

I categorized each blog by scientific field: 

Anthropology, Astronomy, Biology, Botany, Chemistry, Engineering/Technology, Environmental Science, General Science, Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Medical, Paleontology, Physics, Psychology and Zoology.

The first post got too big, and I’ve had to split it into two posts.

This post contains the fields of Anthropology, Astronomy, Biology, Botany, Chemistry, Engineering/Technology and Environmental Science.

Post #2 contains General Science, Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Medical, Paleontology, Physics, Psychology and Zoology.

If you’re not happy with the section I put you in, send me a message and I’ll make an edit. I had to make quick decisions on hundreds of blogs, I’m only human.

Its a LONG post, so it might be easier to just search for the field you’re interested in.

With that said, enjoy!

Read More

Feeling very honoured to be part of a list containing so many quality blogs. Thank you! 

Posted on August 20 with 3,446 notes at 6:39 pm


The Neanderthals died out about 10,000 years earlier than previously thought, new fossil dating suggests, adding to evidence that the arrival of modern humans in Europe pushed our ancient Stone Age cousins into extinction.
Image: A Neanderthal jawbone from Spain was among those dated for a new study that pushes back the date for the Neanderthals’ demise.
Full article from National Geographic

The Neanderthals died out about 10,000 years earlier than previously thought, new fossil dating suggests, adding to evidence that the arrival of modern humans in Europe pushed our ancient Stone Age cousins into extinction.

Image: A Neanderthal jawbone from Spain was among those dated for a new study that pushes back the date for the Neanderthals’ demise.

Full article from National Geographic

Posted on August 20 with 1 note at 6:30 pm

Posted on August 19 with 2,772 notes at 6:18 pm

Humans are the only mammal that cannot swallow and breathe at the same time

humananatomyfacts:

The reason for this is that humans’ voice boxes are unusually low in their throats compared to other animals. In turn, this allows our voices to resonate much more, which allows for us to produce such a wide variety of sounds!

Posted on August 19 with 49 notes at 6:11 pm

humanisticscience:

But really, if you’ve ever opened up any sort of science textbook you’ve no doubt seen this walk of evolution image. The problem is, Man (that is, the depiction of modern homo sapiens) instantly becomes White European Man. Unfortunately, most pictures depicting this “evolutionary walk” instantly evolve homo sapiens into a white male with clear European features, which is problematic for an obvious number of reasons. 

Posted on August 13 with 4,004 notes at 6:11 pm

Can’t resist cooing over pictures of baby animals? Blame evolution…

There is an obvious evolutionary explanation as to why we are drawn to human young - they need looking after or our species will die out.
But why do we have the feeling towards most baby mammals?
Nobel prize-winning Austrian academic Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989), who studied the evolutionary and adaptive significance of human behaviours - human ethology - pointed out many animals, for reasons entirely unrelated to enticing humans to be their caregivers, possess some features also shared by human babies but not adults: Large eyes, snub nose, bulging forehead and retreating chin.
Lorenz believed we are tricked by an evolved response to human young and we transfer our reaction to the same set of features in other mammals.
Anthropologist Andrew Marlow argues this reaction boils down to the way we, as humans, develop.
He suggests the bar for triggering the nurturing impulse is very low in humans, because human babies are ill-equipped to survive and need an enormous amount of looking after.
"It is partly an evolutionary battle between the pelvis and the cranium," said Dr Marlow.
"We are the only animal which walks exclusively on two legs. It freed our arms for using tools, weapons and gathering food. But the trade-off is that to accommodate our bipedalism, pelvises shifted position and became narrower.
A modern woman is not physically capable of giving birth to anything larger than the head of a baby. Therefore the human brain has to develop a lot after birth, rather than in utero. Human babies are very vulnerable.”
Lorenz pointed out we judge the appearance of other animals by the same criteria as we judge our own - although the judgment may be utterly inappropriate in an evolutionary context.
(Read the full article )

Can’t resist cooing over pictures of baby animals? Blame evolution…

There is an obvious evolutionary explanation as to why we are drawn to human young - they need looking after or our species will die out.

But why do we have the feeling towards most baby mammals?

Nobel prize-winning Austrian academic Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989), who studied the evolutionary and adaptive significance of human behaviours - human ethology - pointed out many animals, for reasons entirely unrelated to enticing humans to be their caregivers, possess some features also shared by human babies but not adults: Large eyes, snub nose, bulging forehead and retreating chin.

Lorenz believed we are tricked by an evolved response to human young and we transfer our reaction to the same set of features in other mammals.

Anthropologist Andrew Marlow argues this reaction boils down to the way we, as humans, develop.

He suggests the bar for triggering the nurturing impulse is very low in humans, because human babies are ill-equipped to survive and need an enormous amount of looking after.

"It is partly an evolutionary battle between the pelvis and the cranium," said Dr Marlow.

"We are the only animal which walks exclusively on two legs. It freed our arms for using tools, weapons and gathering food. But the trade-off is that to accommodate our bipedalism, pelvises shifted position and became narrower.

A modern woman is not physically capable of giving birth to anything larger than the head of a baby. Therefore the human brain has to develop a lot after birth, rather than in utero. Human babies are very vulnerable.”

Lorenz pointed out we judge the appearance of other animals by the same criteria as we judge our own - although the judgment may be utterly inappropriate in an evolutionary context.

(Read the full article )

Posted on August 13 with 5 notes at 6:01 pm

aspacelobster:

sixpenceee:

Blond hair is usually seen as synonymous with Caucasian people. However, blond hair actually also regularly occurs among the Melanesian people of New Guinea and some Pacific islands. Melanesian blond hair is curly, and it appears straw-colored. 

SOURCE

Yeah, and the gene responsible for blonde hair in Melanesian people is actually different to that of caucasian people!
Blonde hair evolved twice! How crazy is that!

Posted on August 13 with 5,756 notes at 5:37 pm


A gorilla, and a human baby reacting to the coldness of the stethoscope exactly the same way.

A gorilla, and a human baby reacting to the coldness of the stethoscope exactly the same way.


Now that I have looked into my genes, the result is not a simplified self-image. On the contrary. It is rather that I am experiencing more facets and nuances in my life. It is far more satisfying to be able to interpret myself as both a biological and a social being. My genes are not fate but cards I have been dealt, and some of those cards give me a certain amount of latitude in playing the game of life. Or, to turn another phrase, my genome is not a straitjacket but a soft sweater to fill and shape, to snuggle up and stretch out in. It is information I can work with and around, information that can grant me greater freedom to shape my life and my essence. It is also information that can, in its way, ease my existential burden. It tells me that I am not totally free, but neither am I completely responsible for who I am and what I have ultimately become.

So who am I?

I am what I do with this beautiful information that has flowed through millions of years through billions of organisms and has, now, finally been entrusted to me.

-Lone Frank, My Beautiful Genome
Posted on August 10 with 4 notes at 4:57 pm

Posted on August 10 with 1,056 notes at 4:53 pm